The winter destination, far away from Europe but easy to reach, we are paragliding on La Palma during the whole year.
The paragliding istructor from Palmaclub is also a successful author of specialized books across paragliding and weather.
With its own complexity and interesting: so is weather on the Canaries.
La Palma: Paragliding in Paradise
Pilots with some experience can book our professional para GuideService. Experienced instructors living on the island are teaching you about the meteorological conditions, driving you to the best spots and accompanying you during your paragliding holidays. No question that this is done in your mother tongue (English, German, French, Italian or Spanish)

Paragliding on la Palma is a dream, thermals most light and easy to center. Missing out landing possibilities and the special meteorological conditions are increasing the demand in skills. We are flying mostly in lee conditions and there might be several wind changes during the day. As said, this increases the demand for skills especially in regard to judge on the current meteorological conditions. Beginners or pilots with less experience are better visiting the island with a paragliding school. Pilots flying on this island not only have to be sure in their judgment of the conditions but also need to be able to descend rapidly and land.

Please read the instruction leaflet from the paragliding school Palmaclub. There are natural reserves regulation this is why only the official take-offs might be used. Currently, there are 8 official take offs and we are in the process to legalize more.

Detailed information is to be found in the Palmaclub information brochure. This is available free of charge in the office in Puerto Naos.

To use the infrastructure of the club, a weekly fee of € 14.-- has to be paid per week before using take-off. There is also a annual card for € 35.-- available. Please visit us in the office situated in the Panaderia Alemana, Calle Juana Tabares N°3 in Puerto Naos.
UNESCO Biosphere Reserve
  • BeachDream.jpg
  • CalderaRocks.jpg
  • Campanarios.jpg
  • Cascadadelascolores.jpg
  • Dolphin.jpg
  • Drago.jpg
  • FaroBombilla.jpg
  • Forest.jpg
  • Gleitschirm.jpg
  • GSCloud.jpg
  • Idafe.jpg
  • Jable.jpg
  • MnaQuemada.jpg
  • PillowLava.jpg
  • PuertoTazacorte.jpg
  • Puntagorda.jpg
  • Salinas.jpg
  • Vulkan.jpg
Text from UNESCO page:
The Biosphere Reserve of 'La Palma' in the Canary Islands was extended and renamed in 2002 (the ancient Los Tiles Biosphere Reserve is now constituting the core area). The biosphere reserve now encompasses the entire island, which contains a wide range of representative habitats with all the diversity provided by the transition from the coast up to the mountain peaks.

Declaration Date:                           1983 (El Canal and Los Tiles).
First extension:                                1997 (LosTiles).
Extension to the whole island:     2002

Surface Area: 80,702 ha (70,832 ha on land), (core: 17 percent; buffer: 40 per cent; transition: 43 per cent)
Administrative Division: 14 Municipalities have their territory in the Biosphere Reserve

Human Activities
Agriculture (banana plantations), animal husbandry, bee keeping and fishing. Presently agro-tourism and crafts are in the process of considerable development.

Ecological Characteristics
La Palma, with its highest peak, Roque de los Muchachos, at 2,426 m, is considered to be one of the highest islands in the world in relation to its surface area.

It is truly a miniature continent that contains, staggered at different altitudes, all the representative ecosystems of the Macaronesian region, a biogeographical region grouping the Archipelagos of the Canaries, Madeira and Azores.

Starting from the coastal Euphorbia obtusifolia and Spurges, then giving way to the thermophile forest and subsequently to monteverde vegetation (Laurel forests, Tree Heath and Fayatree), to be substituted at greater altitudes by Canary Pineand finally by Adenocarpus viscosus and scrubland at thesummit.

The spectacular Laurel tree forests associated with horizontal precipitation-condensation of coastal fogs caused by the humid trade winds are particularly note worthy.

This permanent atmospheric humidity, characteristic of the Tertiary Era, has enabled relict plants to survive. Forest functionis also vital for aquifer replenishment which is essential for the development of the Island.

Among the fauna, numerous endemic insect species are to be found and some unique birds, such as Bolle’s Laurel Pigeon and the White tailed Laurel Pigeon
 

Copyright 2017 © idafe.com

Impressum